The frustrations of the Savior

Matthew 17:14-20

A man came up to Jesus, knelt down before him, and said,
“Lord, have pity on my son, who is a lunatic and suffers severely;
often he falls into fire, and often into water.
I brought him to your disciples, but they could not cure him.”
Jesus said in reply,
“O faithless and perverse generation, how long will I be with you?
How long will I endure you?
Bring the boy here to me.”
Jesus rebuked him and the demon came out of him,
and from that hour the boy was cured.
Then the disciples approached Jesus in private and said,
“Why could we not drive it out?”
He said to them, “Because of your little faith.
Amen, I say to you, if you have faith the size of a mustard seed,
you will say to this mountain,
‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move.
Nothing will be impossible for you.”

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Do we love as Jesus commands?

Matthew 22:34-40

When the Pharisees heard that Jesus had silenced the Sadducees, they gathered together, and one of them, a scholar of the law, tested him by asking, “Teacher, which commandment in the law is the greatest?” Jesus said to him, “You shall love the Lord, your God, with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind. This is the greatest and the first commandment. The second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself. The whole law and the prophets depend on these two commandments.”

Everything that we believe, all that the Church teaches us about how to live is summed up in and based on these two great commandments. Jesus is the Lord of Love, and if we wish to follow him, we must love as He commands. This command requires such complete and utter selflessness. The perfect example of this humble submission to the law of love is Jesus himself. His love lead Him all the way to the cross, where He suffered and died for us. He is our model and our proof that Love exists. In Him, and from Him we find strength to overcome our selfish inclinations.

the Will of the His heavenly Father

Matthew 12:46-50

While Jesus was speaking to the crowds,
his mother and his brothers appeared outside,
wishing to speak with him.
Someone told him, “Your mother and your brothers are standing outside,
asking to speak with you.”
But he said in reply to the one who told him,
“Who is my mother? Who are my brothers?”
And stretching out his hand toward his disciples, he said,
“Here are my mother and my brothers.
For whoever does the will of my heavenly Father
is my brother, and sister, and mother.”

“…Whoever does the will of my heavenly Father is my brother, and sister, and mother.”

The Will of God is everything for the Christian.
It is light in darkness. It is the clarity in confusion. It is solid ground in turmoil. It is hope in distress. It is joy in sadness.

There is so much noise and distraction, so many choices and so many different things that vie for our attention in our lives that we often feel confused. Amidst it all, we want a simple rule or a pithy saying to hold on to, words to live by etc. One can see them all over- on bumper stickers, coffee mugs, posters and painted signs for house decor.

For the Christian, it is quite simple. We must do the will of His heavenly Father. To discover the Will of God for ourselves and to embrace it with our whole being, that is to fully live.

Anointing of the Sick

Gospel Mark 6:7-13

Jesus summoned the Twelve and began to send them out two by two

and gave them authority over unclean spirits.

He instructed them to take nothing for the journey but a walking stick

–no food, no sack, no money in their belts.

They were, however, to wear sandals but not a second tunic.

He said to them,

“Wherever you enter a house, stay there until you leave from there.

Whatever place does not welcome you or listen to you,

leave there and shake the dust off your feet

in testimony against them.”

So they went off and preached repentance.

The Twelve drove out many demons,

and they anointed with oil many who were sick and cured them.

There are seven sacraments. They are Baptism, Eucharist, Confirmation, Reconciliation/Penance, Anointing of the Sick, Holy Orders and Matrimony. A sacrament is an outward sign, instituted by Christ to give grace.

What does this definition mean?

As an outward sign, we can see, touch, and hear the sacraments. We can perceive them with our senses. All of the sacraments were instituted by Christ. That means that we can read in the Sacred Scriptures that Christ himself first performed the sacraments. The sacraments give us grace. Grace is invisible. It is not perceived with our senses. It is a very real sharing in God’s life. Grace makes us holy. Grace makes us one with God. Grace enables us to live a life pleasing to God, and grace is necessary for us to get to Heaven. It is our “ticket to Heaven.”

In this bible story, we see Jesus sending out the Twelve Apostles to share in His ministry of saving the world. Re read the last line. “[A]nd they anointed with oil many who were sick and cured them.” This line gives us evidence of that the sacrament of Anointing of the Sick was performed over 2000 years ago. Taught by Christ and being the first ministers of the Church, the Apostles anointed the sick, just as our priest do today.